PALAZZO PANTS PANDEMONIUM!

Wide leg pants have been around and popular in the fashion world for many years – be it as a palazzo pant or a bell-bottom pant leg. Wide, free flowing legged pants look both elegant and feminine when the wearer is standing still, or walking and giving movement to the flowing material.

Palazzo pants (also known as palazzo trousers) are long women’s pants cut with a loose, extremely wide leg that flares from the waist down. Palazzo pants are popular as a summer season style, as they are loose and tend to be flattering in light, flowing fabrics that are cool and breathable in hot weather.

Palazzo pants differ from bell-bottoms in the fact while palazzo slacks fit loose on the thighs, bell-bottoms become wider from the knees downward, forming a bell-like shape of the lower pant leg.

Pretty in palazzo pants!

Silk crepe, jersey and other natural fiber textiles are popular fabrics for palazzo pants. For cooler months, wool and heavy synthetic fabrics work well for the palazzo style.

Palazzo Pants Fun Fact: Palazzo pants for women first became a popular trend in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The style was reminiscent of the wide legged cuffed trousers worn by some women fond of avant-garde fashions in the 1930s and 1940s, particularly actresses such as Katherine Hepburn, Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich.

Due to the feminine, flowing feel of the palazzo pant, the type of shoe that you prefer to wear with the slacks can make your outfit more dressy or more casual, depending on your preference. Do you want to appear upscale and sophisticated? Try a fancy palazzo pant with high heels or high heeled platform shoes and an elegant blazer or silk blouse. If you prefer a more casual, daytime look, sandals and a crop top mix wonderfully with palazzo pants!

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Palazzo Pants Fun Fact: Palazzo pants are not to be confused with Gaucho trousers, which  only extend to mid-calf length. Harem pants are yet another loose style, but they have a snug cuff around the ankles.

Create a stir in a palazzo pants fashion parade.

Palazzo pants pandemonium!

Palazzo pants can be found both as high waist pants or hip hugger pants. Whatever your unique signature style, fashion diva. Both ways wear well!

Palazzo Pants Fun Fact: During the 1960s, some upscale restaurants resisted modern fashion trends by refusing to admit women wearing trousers, which were considered inappropriate by some proprietors. This posed a problem for women who did not want to wear the skirt styles that were in fashion. Some women solved the problem of the ban on women in pants by wearing palazzo pants or culottes as evening wear.

The flowing leg of the palazzo pant almost gives an open skirt effect, both when standing still and when walking.

Palazzo pants wear well with all age ranges. The palazzo pant can be made to look both chic and classy, or youthful and playful.

Palazzo pants flare out evenly from the waist to the ankle, and are therefore different from bell-bottoms, which are snug around the thigh until they flare out from the knee.

Golly gee, I must find some pretty palazzo pants for the fashion plate that is me!

Palazzo Pant Fashion Tip: If you love wearing hats but find that they don’t mix with many outfits, a gorgeous floppy hat always adds oomph and pizzazz to a palazzo pant. The overall look just fits…well, perfectly!

Hats off to the hat and the palazzo pant!

Similar to palazzo pants, loon pants (shortened for balloon pants) were a variant of the palazzo, with an increased flare. Elephant bells, popular in the mid-to-late 1970s, were similar to loon pants, but were typically made of denim.

Palazzo Pant Fashion Tip: Due to the wide, flowing material around the ankle, palazzo pants are the perfect pant for wearing with platform heels. A platform shoe with a sole at least 2 inches thick and heels 4 to 5 inches helps to keep the pant’s hem from flowing on the ground. Also, the way the material drapes over the platform shoe looks elegant and dainty!

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Picture perfect in palazzo pants.

“Don’t you think those palazzo pants are a little too tight for you?”

“I think you need glasses. The pant leg is loose and lets me move.”

“Forgive me dear madam, I was merely being clever.”

“Your comments aren’t funny. Not now, not ever.”

“I’d think you’d be flattered that I noticed your striking pants.”

“You can watch the flowing legs sway when I walk away and prance.”

Palazzo pants: the perfect pair of pants to prance pleasantly away in!

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Nancy Mangano is an American fashion journalist and author of the Natalie North murder mystery book series, A Passion for Prying and Murder Can Be Messy. Visit Nancy on her author website http://www.nancymangano.com, Twitter @https://twitter.com/nancymangano, her fashion magazine Strutting in Style! at http://www.struttinginstyle.com, and her Facebook fan page Nancy Mangano https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nancy-Mangano/362187023895846

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About authornancymangano

Nancy Mangano resides in Orange County, CA. She has blended her love of detective work and style in her novels, A Passion for Prying and Murder Can Be Messy.
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