DAZZLING BIG GLAMOUR IN THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS!

Another holiday post, you say? Yes, and one that can never be forgotten or ignored for holiday parties, Christmas Eve gatherings and New Year’s Eve celebrations. Let me see, what could it be?

The little black dress, of course!

A little black dress is a black evening or cocktail dress, cut simply and is often quite short. Although the hem of the little black dress sometimes comes to the knee, any dress longer (calf-length, ankle-length, maxi dresses) do not qualify as a little black dress in the true sense of the knock-out garment.

Little Black Dress Fun Fact: The origins of the little black dress go to the 1920s designs of Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel and Jean Patou. The little black dress was intended to be long-lasting, versatile, affordable, accessible to the widest market possible, and of course, black. The Little Black Dress is often referred to as the LBD.

The little black dress is considered essential to a complete wardrobe by many women and fashion observers, who believe it a “rule of fashion” that every woman should own a simple, elegant black dress that can be dressed up or down depending on the occasion and the accessories worn with the dress (jewelry, shoes). Accessories for the little black dress should be minimal, as the dress is the true star of the show!

Since the little black dress is a staple of a woman’s wardrobe, the dress is intended to remain stylish and chic for a number of years.

In addition to the simple yet elegant style of the little black dress, the color black adds to the garment’s allure and timeless appeal. Black is the darkest color, the result of the absence of or complete absorption of light. Black is literally a color without color or hue.

Dazzling big glamour in the little black dress!

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Little Black Dress Fun Fact: In 1926, Coco Chanel published a picture of a short, simple black dress in American Vogue. The dress fit straight and was decorated only by a few diagonal lines. Vogue called the dress “Chanel’s Ford”. Like the Model T, the little black dress was simple and accessible for women of all social classes. Vogue also said that the little black dress would become “a sort of uniform for all women of taste.” How right they were!

Reasons to Own a Little Black Dress:

  1. The dress never looks frumpy or frugal…only fashionable and fabulous.
  2. The little black dress is always in style.
  3. The color black tends to have a slimming effect on the physique.
  4. The little black dress is appropriate for most all occasions, dressed up or down.
  5. Cool elegance for all closets!

Color Black Fun Fact: Black was one of the first colors used by artists in Neolithic cave paintings. In the 14th century, black began to be worn by royalty, clergy, judges and government officials in much of Europe. Black became the color worn by English romantic poets, businessmen and statesmen in the 19th century, and a high fashion color in the 20th century.

The little black dress is elegant, sophisticated, classy, and magical. Sexy and sensual.

Little Black Dress Fun Fact: The black Givenchy dress worn by Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, designed by Hubert de Givenchy, epitomized the standard for wearing little black dresses accessorized with white pearls. The dress set a record in 2006 when it was auctioned for six times its original estimate.

The little black dress received a well deserved boop, boop, boop, boop, when Betty Boop, a cartoon character based in part on the 1920s “It” girl Clara Bow, was drawn wearing a little black dress in her early films. Later, with Technicolor, Betty Boop’s dress became red.

In popular culture, the little black dress lives on! Think the Hollies 1972 single “Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress”, Gavin Friday’s song “Little Black Dress”, Chris Young’s “Gettin’ You Home (The Black Dress Song)” in 2009, and One Direction’s song “The Little Black Dress” on their third album Midnight.

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Prior to the 1920s, black clothing was reserved for periods of mourning and considered indecent when worn outside such circumstances. Although the color black still signifies mourning and respect, the color black in garments also shouts cool, suave, elite. Look at me…I’m here in beautiful black splendor!

“May I help you?”

“I’m looking for the perfect little black dress.”

“Ah, great choice. A definite fashion best.”

“I’d like an elegant style with ruffled or lace trim.”

“Something that makes you stand out and draws him in?”

“Yes, a dress that says sensual and sleek with  a tad of sin.”

“The naughty and nice vibe is a definite fashion win!”

Win big adorned in the little black dress! Haute Couture fashion at its best!

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Nancy Mangano is an American fashion journalist and author of the Natalie North murder mystery book series, A Passion for Prying and Murder Can Be Messy. Visit Nancy on her author website http://www.nancymangano.com, Twitter @https://twitter.com/nancymangano, her fashion magazine Strutting in Style! at http://www.struttinginstyle.com, and her Facebook fan page Nancy Mangano https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nancy-Mangano/362187023895846

 

 

 

 

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About authornancymangano

Nancy Mangano resides in Orange County, CA. She has blended her love of detective work and style in her novels, A Passion for Prying and Murder Can Be Messy.
This entry was posted in American Fashion Journalist Nancy Mangano, Author Nancy Mangano, Beauty, Books, Entertainment, Fahion Magazine, Fashion, Glamour, Novels, Style, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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