Piggybacking on My Prior High Heel Blog Post: Pointy Toed Stilettos!

From the comments that I received on my last style blog post dated July 22, 2013, Styling High in Low High Heels, women love their shoes! For some of us, the higher the heel, the better. For others, the lower the heel the better. Since it seems to be a universal truth that women are going to wear high heeled shoes, I thought it would be fun to showcase various high heeled, pointy toed pumps!

Winkle Pickers, or Winklepickers, are a style of shoe or boot worn from the 1950s onward by male and female British rock and roll fans. The feature that gives both the boot and the shoe their name is the very sharp and long pointed toe. The pointed toe was called the winkle picker toe because in England, periwinkle snails, or winkles, were a popular seaside snack, which is eaten using a pin or other pointed object to extract the edible parts out of the coiled shell, hence the phrase “to winkle something out”, and from that, winkle pickers became a humorous name for shoes with an extremely pointed tip!

Whether you call them winkle pickers or pointy toed stilettos, the pointed toed high heel is a popular fashion choice that always remains in style!

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Fans of long, pointed toed shoes understand that extending and exaggerating the shoe’s pointed toe not only makes for a strong style/fashion statement, the pointed toe is actually comfortable to wear (although it looks extremely painful). When a pointed toed shoe is on your foot, your toes do not slide all the way to the tip of the shoe, so the shoe comes to a toe-free point!

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A high stiletto shoe with long pointed toes are simultaneously feminine and aggressive. When these shoes are worn with skirts, dresses, straight legged pants or capri pants, the shoe is exaggerated, noticeable and a great highlight to your overall outfit.

Grrrrrrrrr!

Pointy toed high heels are adventurous, daring and dazzling!

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Pointed toed high heels are fun, fabulous and high fashion!

Pointed Toed Stiletto Fun Fact: Most of the 1960s pointy toed stilettos for day wear were medium heels around 3 to 3.75 inches in height. The curvaceous slenderness of the shoe, as well as the way the high heel slenderizes and elongates the leg, makes the shoes look higher.

Add inches to your height and to your toes with the pointed toed high heel!

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Pointed Toed High Heel Fun Fact: To accommodate the foot, a pointed toed shoe must extend some distance beyond the natural toe line. Contrary to the view of some people, pointed toed shoes don’t make your feet look longer, it merely appears that you are wearing pointed toed shoes!

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Far from being a fetish item, the pointed toed stiletto shoes are extremely popular with modern and mainstream fashion!

Quench your high heel passion: go pointy toed!

In deciphering fashion, the height and pointiness of a woman’s shoe is considered an indicator of her style-consciousness, and her ability to walk well in a pointed stiletto is a sign of her maturity and sophistication!

Whether you prefer bright colored or a more subdued color of shoe, low heels or high heels or high, high, heels, I suggest giving the pointed toed stiletto a try!

You’ll walk in style with your physique and your head held high!

Author Nancy Mangano is the author of two novels, A Passion for Prying and Murder Can Be Messy. Nancy has blended her love of detective work and her flair for fashion into her novels. Visit Nancy on her author website at http://www.nancymangano.com, her author/fashion/style blog http://www.passionforprying.wordpress.com, Twitter @nancymangano and her author “like” Facebook fan page Nancy Mangano.

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About authornancymangano

Nancy Mangano resides in Orange County, CA. She has blended her love of detective work and style in her novels, A Passion for Prying and Murder Can Be Messy.
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